Walterboro, SC

PDF Documents

AmistadDocuments.pdf (in zip format)
63 pages of Amistad orignal documents. Including: John Quincy Adams’ legal papers; Cinqué and Kimbo affidavids; The Supreme Court opinion by Justice Joseph Story on the Amistad Case; Congressional record of Amistad developments; and witness statements

Argument of John Quincy Adams.pdf
Argument of John Quincy Adams, before the Supreme Court of the United States A ditigal copy of the publication:
Argument of John Quincy Adams, before the Supreme Court of the United States : in the case of the United States,
appellants, vs. Cinque, and others, Africans, captured in the schooner Amistad, by Lieut. Gedney, delivered on the
24th of February and 1st of March, 1841 : with a review of the case of the Antelope, reported in the 10th, 11th, and
12th volumes of Wheaton’s Reports. Publised in 1841.

Argument of Roger S. Baldwin.pdf
Argument of Roger S. Baldwin, of New Haven, before the Supreme Court A ditigal copy of the publication:Argument
of Roger S. Baldwin, of New Haven, before the Supreme Court of the United States, in the case of the United States,
appellants, vs. Cinque, and others, Africans of the Amistad. Baldwin, Roger S. 1793-1863. (Roger Sherman).
Published New York : S. W. Benedict, 1841.Included in addition to the material above is a ditigal copy of William E.
Channing’s The Duty of the Free States or Remarks Suggested by the Case of the Creole.Boston: William Crosby &
Company, 1842. In November 1841 the 135 enslaved African Americans on board the ship Creole overpowered the
crew, murdering one man, while sailing from Hampton Roads, Virginia, to New Orleans, Louisiana. Led by Madison
Washington, they sailed the vessel to Nassau, Bahamas, where the British declared most of them free. This
pamphlet’s author, William Channing, refutes the American claims that the property of U.S. slave owners should be
protected in foreign ports. In the diplomatic controversy that followed, Ohio Congressman Joshua Giddings argued
that once the ship was outside of U.S. territorial waters, the African Americans were entitled to their liberty and that
any attempt to reenslave them would be unconstitutional. Censured by the House of Representatives, he resigned,
but his constituents quickly reelected him and sent him back to Congress.

History of the Amistad Captives.pdf
A History of the Amistad Captives: Being a Circumstantial Account of the Capture of the Spanish Schooner Amistad.
A digitaly reprouduced copy of the book, “A History of the Amistad Captives: Being a Circumstantial Account of the
Capture of the Spanish Schooner Amistad.” This book “compiled from authentic sources” by John W. Barber (1798-
1885) , was published in New Haven, Connecticut, in 1840, and reports the trials in the lower courts, but not the
Supreme Court decision that freed the captives. The book contains biographical statements for each of the surviving
Africans, with illustrations, including profile portraits of each captive. This history also provides information on the
location of the Africans’ homes, their occupations, family, local government, involvement with slavery and the slave
trade, and details of their capture and sale.

The Duty of the Free States.pdf
William E. Channing’s The Duty of the Free States or Remarks Suggested by the Case of the Creole.Boston: William
Crosby & Company, 1842. In November 1841 the 135 enslaved African Americans on board the ship Creole
overpowered the crew, murdering one man, while sailing from Hampton Roads, Virginia, to New Orleans, Louisiana.
Led by Madison Washington, they sailed the vessel to Nassau, Bahamas, where the British declared most of them
free. This pamphlet’s author, William Channing, refutes the American claims that the property of U.S. slave owners
should be protected in foreign ports. In the diplomatic controversy that followed, Ohio Congressman Joshua Giddings argued that once the ship was outside of U.S. territorial waters, the African Americans were entitled to their liberty and that any attempt to re-enslave them would be unconstitutional. Censured by the House